frugal anarchy

Of all the systems that we seek freedom within and from, none pervades our lives as much as the “econosphere” we inhabit. By “econosphere”, I mean the global network of economic activity whose nodes are individuals and whose edges are trade relationships between individuals. Even if we had no government, we’d still likely be trading […]

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freshwater and Canadian sovereignty

Canada holds seven percent of the world’s renewable freshwater [1]. While it is unclear how much this percentage or volume will be impacted by climate change, let’s assume for the sake of argument that Canada will retain its significant freshwater resources for the next century. Contrast that with the neighboring United States, where freshwater is […]

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when pi = 4

We are all familiar with the equation relating a circle’s radius to its circumference: Rearranging, we get and in Euclidean geometry we determine pi’s value of 3.14158… given a circle of any radius. But in the non-Euclidean taxicab geometry, pi equals four, which will be demonstrated below. Taxicab geometry is a two-dimensional geometry where points […]

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finding the ‘least bloggable units’ in a story

This post guides my growth as a writer; I’m posting it simply to hold myself accountable for the idea. When I started crafting what eventually became last Tuesday’s blog post about how survey questionnaires amplify questionnaire writers’ biases, I envisioned a much longer post examining how the delivery of survey questionnaires through web browsers—instead of […]

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bias reinforcement through survey questionnaires

Today I play media theorist and examine how survey questionnaires reinforce survey designers’ biases: The knowledge that biases emit from survey questionnaires is nothing new. The extreme case, “push-polling”, intentionally guides the questionnaire reader toward a viewpoint, without real interest in their prior opinion. Any survey writer willing to push-poll already understands my concerns about […]

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